Ibis Mojo HD4 Review

August 29, 2017

 

Who is Ibis : Nestled away in the heart of Santa Cruz, Ibis Cycles has some of the world's flowiest trails right in their backyard. It comes as no surprise then that Ibis has always had some of the poppiest, most nimble bikes in their respective categories, maximizing the fun factor on fast flowy trails! The Ibis Mojo HD model has been around for quite some time and has seen some amazing updates over the years. It has always been that enduro bike for a rider looking for amazing pedal efficiency, poppiness, and the ability to let the brakes go while enjoying technical descents. When I first saw the Mojo HD4 release, I knew that I had to have that bike. After spending some time on it I can say confidently that Ibis absolutely knocked this one out of the park!

What: The Ibis Mojo HD4 is a bike that people have been asking for, for quite some time. Maintaining that sweet spot for efficiency and aggressiveness in an enduro bike is not an easy balancing act. Oftentimes, bikes lean one way or the other, with some being amazing on the downs, but not up and others sacrificing a bit of downhill prowess for the ability to be extremely efficient, as well as nimble. The older Mojo HD’s as well as the HDR tended to fit a bit in the latter category, never really taking that full dive into the aggressive geometry market. When the HD3 was released, that changed a bit, but it still wasn’t enough for a few riders who really wanted to get rowdy on the downhills and wanted Ibis efficiency for the climbs. The HD4 answers those requests! Sporting a 64.9 degree head angle, 153 mm of travel, stiffer frame, longer reach (tall people rejoice, a 34mm increase on reach in an XL), and much more progressive suspension rate, the HD4 took a plunge even deeper into the enduro market. The HD4 I am currently testing has a XT 1x build with a Fox 36 RC2 Fork, Float X2 Rear Shock, and 2.6 Minions on Ibis 738 Aluminum Rims.

How does it Pedal/Climb? : Let me get the obvious out of the way. The HD4 is an amazing pedaler for its category. Actually scratch that. The HD4 is an amazing pedaler not only for its enduro category, but also for a lot of bikes with significantly less travel. Get on the gas and the bike rockets forward with every pedal stroke. I rarely found myself using the lockout on the Fox Float X2 for flatter, hard out of the saddle, sprints. On steeper climbs the 2 position lockout is appreciated, but I did find myself using it far less than on other bikes with the same amount of travel. With a long top tube, slack head angle, and short chainstay, finding that balance spot on climbs (where you can put your weight forward enough to keep the front end down, but prevent the rear wheel from spinning out), does take a few rides to lock in, but after that it is smooth sailing.  I'm not sure how the folks at Ibis Cycles and Dave Weagle (DW-Link Mastermind) did it, but the HD4 is in another league when it comes to putting the power down on the trails. 

How does it Descend? : So now for the fun part! You have paid your dues and made it to the top of your favorite descent, how is the HD4 going to perform down? Simply put, the HD4 is everything an Enduro bike should be and more! I have been consistently blown away by how such a stable bike is so nimble when a corner pops up as I am flying full tilt boogie down my local trails. A huge part of this is the HD4’s spot on geometry. The slack head angle, combined with the long top tube gives me all the stability I could want from the front end of the bike, while the super short chainstay lets me have ultimate control when I need to react suddenly (or roost an unexpected corner!). The poppiness of the bike also shines as well, giving you the ability to jump out of corners and into the next one. The HD4 is a bike that rewards high speed riding, so if you are a rider who finds yourself really pushing your bikes and want the perfect blend of stability and nimbleness on descents, the HD4 is pretty tough to pass up in those regards. With all of that being said I must mention that if you are a rider that finds yourself hucking to flat and hitting massive drops frequently during a ride, there are a few other bikes that might be a little bit more up to the task. Not saying that the HD4 doesn't handle its own on big drops and jumps, however at the end of the day Ibis intended this bike to be the ultimate efficient enduro bike, and with that, the travel doesn't necessarily feel bottomless. However if you are not known to huck-to-flat every opportunity you get, this shouldn’t really be an issue.

Who is this bike for? : Ibis cycles definitely knocked it out of the park with the Mojo HD4. Extremely efficient on climbs while blending the perfect combination of stable/nimble on the descents, the Ibis HD4 is sure to put a smile on your face both up and down. Who is this bike for? If you are a rider who loves to get rowdy on steep terrain, however do not want to sacrifice much in terms of pedaling efficiency, the HD4 is your bike. It rewards riders who pick challenging lines, so if technical terrain isn’t really your style, I would probably be looking at the HD4’s sibling, the Mojo 3. Either way you go, an Ibis bike is sure to put a smile on your face. Kudos to Ibis for killing it with the new HD4 and looking forward to getting even more miles on this awesome enduro bike!

Happy Trails!  

           https://www.probikesupply.com/collections/ibis-mojo-hd4

 

 

 


 

 

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