Build Spotlight: the Yeti SB100 is not heavy!

February 25, 2019 1 Comment

Is it is a trail bike or is it a cross country bike? That’s one of the most common questions we hear about the Yeti SB100. Yes, it can do both, for right now we'll just focus on the xc side of things. Some racers will take a look at the 25 lb quoted weights listed on Yeti’s site and immediately rule out the bike. “Why would I go with an SB100 when an Epic or Blur is so much lighter?” To answer this question we need to take a deeper look at individual components, which we’ll do via this bike:

 

It may not look it, but this started as a standard X01 build. By changing a handful of parts we were able to put together our very lightest build at under 23 lbs. Here's how we did it:

The easiest way to save weight is in tires, and when we buy a bike from us we let you choose whatever tires you want. For an SB100, the lightest tires possible without sacrificing too much are the Maxxis Ikon 2.2s or Schwalbe Racing Ralph/Racing Ray 2.25s. Choosing either of these tire combinations will save you close to 600 grams (or 1.3 lbs).

If you don't mind 80mm of drop, the Bike Yoke Divine SL is feather light at 385 grams, saving over 150 grams over the stock Fox Transfer. Shorter riders can even trim the bottom to bring to post's weight down an extra 40 grams!

Another quick way to save weight is through the cassette. Yeti’s X01 build is specced with a GX XG-1275, and you can save 100 grams (.25 lbs) by upgrading to the X01 XG-1295. Interestingly enough, the stock GX shifter is actually slightly lighter than X01, although you do lose some adjustability in the lever.

ENVE’s M525 wheelset comes in just under 1400 grams, comparable to the DT Swiss XRC 1200 upgrade available straight from Yeti (just over 1400 grams). Rather than stick with Yeti’s stock bar and stem, this customer went with a matching kit from ENVE. Surprisingly, the 780mm M6 bar is actually lighter than the 760mm M5 handlebar.

XTR brakes are really the final lightweight piece on this build. Coming in lighter than even SRAM’s Level Ultimate, they’ve been our go-to for any bike trying to break a certain weight threshold.

All in all, this bike ended up weighing 22.73 lbs, which is very respectable for any race bike. We could have easily saved another 300 grams by moving to a Step Cast 32 fork, and even another 200 more by going to a rigid seatpost. That would put this bike easily into the 21 lb range. Next time your friend says this bike is too heavy, show them this post!

Ready to build your own super light SB100? Maybe you just have some questions about the bike. Leave us a comment or contact us at orders@probikesupply.com!




1 Response

Scott Roberts
Scott Roberts

March 02, 2019

What would it cost to build this bike or similar built of equal weight? I’m on the fence between the SB100 (lightened up) or the new S-Works Epic Evo (light out of the box). I am leaning towards the Yeti but I love my current standard Epic.

Thank you….,

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